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Science

CASE Natural Resources and Ecology (NRE)

Junior/Senior students will explore hands-on projects and activities while studying topics such as land use, water quality, stewardship, and environmental agencies. Study of the natural world including biomes, land, air, water, energy, use and care as well as a focus on issues surrounding man's interaction with the Earth will be addressed in this course. Students will select an ecosystem to study throughout the course and apply principles of natural resources and ecology from each unit of study to that ecosystem.


Agriculture Technology

This Jr/Sr course elective can serve as the third science credit toward graduation. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the fundamental principles of scientific agriculture. This course will examine the relationship of agriculture to human survival and human interactions, the place of national and local agriculture and how it relates to population growth and the roles that the consumption and production of food play in society. With additional emphasis on hydroponics and aquaponics.

College Now Biology

College Now Biology is an introductory college-level biology course for seniors. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes—energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions.

Living Environment R
A required course for the majority of freshman. One unit of credit will be granted. Students in this course will also be required to take a back-to-back lab every other day. Prerequisite: Physical Science 8. This course will meet every day for 40 weeks. Recommended grade level: grade 9. The final exam will be the Living Environment Regents. Regents Biology is now called Living Environment. Students taking this course are expected to sit for the regents exam in June. A requirement for the exam is the successful completion of 30 hours of lab work. Successful completion means a grade of 65% or better has been earned upon the first submission of the student's lab work. The course is designed to introduce students to topics in the rapidly changing field of biology. Topics of study include: the cell and its function, biochemistry and chemical regulation, physiology plant and animal, reproduction, genetics, evolution and ecology. Hopefully, students will gain from this class an appreciation of the complexity of biological and ecological systems. That they will become better informed citizens, able to contribute to the decision-making process of the future with a knowledge based on scientific understandings and not fears of the unknown. Assessment is accomplished by way of weekly lab write-ups and unit tests.

Earth Science R

Sophomores pursuing an advance regents diploma will receive the second of their three science credits by passing Earth Science. This course can be used as part of a sequence to earn an Advanced Regents Diploma. One unit of credit will be granted. Students in this course will also be required to take a back-to-back lab with the course every day. The Physical Setting/Regents Earth Science course of study is designed to encourage students to understand the processes of change in earth and space through first-hand observation and inference. Throughout the various units, including Rocks and Minerals, Earthquakes, Landscapes, Geological History, Meteorology and Astronomy, emphasis is placed on scientific inquiry an analysis of data relevant to the NYS Learning Standards. Students will be encouraged to formulate questions that relate to their experiences, and to use their acquired skills to investigate these questions. Throughout the year, timely weather and global issues such as global warming will be explored, with an emphasis on how we interact with the planet Earth, and our responsibility to understand and value our natural environment. Possible fieldtrips to apply skills and knowledge learned throughout the course.Prerequisite: Living Environment R. The course will meet every day for 40 weeks. Recommended grade level: grade 10. The final exam will be the Earth Science Regents.

CASE Agriculture, Food Sciences and Natural Resources (AFNR)
Sophomores will receive the second of thier three science credits by passing Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources course will experience hands-on activities, projects, and problems. Student experiences will involve the study of communication, the science of agriculture, plants, animals, natural resources, and agricultural mechanics. While surveying the opportunities available in agriculture and natural resources, students will learn to solve problems, conduct research, analyze data, work in teams, and take responsibility for their work, actions, and learning. For example, students will work in groups to determine the efficiency and environmental impacts of fuel sources in a practical learning exercise.


Chemistry R
A recommended course for 11-12 grade science students. Also, this course can be used as part of a sequence to earn an Advanced Regents Diploma. One unit of credit will be granted. Students in this course will also be required to take a back-to-back lab with the course every other day. Prerequisite: Earth Science and an advanced math class are preferred. This course will meet every day for 40 weeks. Recommended grade level: grades 11 and 12. Students will be required to take the regents exam in Chemistry as a course final. Our Chemistry course at RSCS prepares our students to pass the New York State Regents exam in chemistry. During the course you will gain an understanding of the structure and states of matter, reaction types, equations and stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, and experimental chemistry. You will also gain the ability to interpret and apply this information you have learned to solve problems. Your course will include a lab period and a lecture period where you will conduct your learning using labs, demos, lecture and a number of group activities.

Astronomy
This class is an overview of all of astronomy. The goal is to study not just what we know about the Universe but also how we know it. How do astronomers use observations and hypotheses to make inferences about things which are vastly remote (distant) and outside of our own experience? The goal is to learn what scientists have found about the processes that control the formation of planets, the birth and death of stars, the formation of galaxies, and the origin and ultimate fate of the Universe. The hope is that it will provide a new perspective on the Earth and our civilization that will change the way we think about our place in the Universe. In this class, students will explore NASA data to construct first-hand knowledge about the astronomical universe. During the first part of class, students will be introduced to the dynamics of astronomy, and the structure of the universe. Then, students will use NASA data to perform astronomical research which will include but not limited to Lunar Research, Kepler data, and Hubble telescope data to learn more about the star evolution and red-shift. Throughout the year students will have the opportunity to participate in a Citizen Science Project of their choice in Astronomy. The class will conclude by the end of the year where students will present their individual astronomy research projects. Possible field trip during the course to apply and extend skills learned through the course.

Natural Disasters + WeatherSemester 1: Natural Disasters - An interdisciplinary examination of the causes, effects, and options available to mitigate natural disasters, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, flooding, and severe weather. The course is student-centered with many hands-on activities.
Semester 2: Weather - The study of land, atmospheric pressure, cloud formation, and storms offer students a never-ending and fascinating look into the forces of nature and our surrounding environment. From how rainbows forms to the impact of pollution on the environment. Exploration of how geography affects weather, cloud formation, wind forces. Weather forecasting methods, as well as an introduction to global weather patterns such as El Nino, are discussed in this essential course.

Regents Physics

An introductory course in high school physics designed to prepare students for the New York State Board of Regents Physics Examination. Key topics in the course include mechanics, electricity and magnetism, waves, optics, and selected modern physics concepts. All students are required to sit for the exam at years end. Pre-Requisite: Regents Algebra/Trig.

Life Science 7
A required course for all 7th-grade students. No units of credit granted. Students must pass this course to move to the next level of science. No prerequisite. This course will meet every day for 40 weeks. Recommended grade level: grade 7. A local final exam will be given. The science course for the seventh-grade student consists of studying Life Science. By the use of notes, worksheets and hands-on labs, the student learns to apply the facts he/she learns in class to everyday life. They learn about the basics of biology as it pertains to many biotic organisms. The course concentrates on the Plant and Animal Kingdoms primarily but touches upon ecology and environmental issues. The course culminates in a final exam at the end of the school year.

Physical Science 8
A required course for all 8th grade students. No units of credit granted. Students must pass this course to move to the next level of science. Prerequisite: Science 7. This course will meet every day for 40 weeks. Recommended grade level: grade 8. A local final exam will be given. The goal of the 8th grade science course is to prepare our students for the 8th grade intermediate level science exam. This exam is designed to test our students on the last four years of their science exam. This exam is designed to test our students on the last four years of their science study. During 8th grade science, our students take a hands on approach to learn the physical setting curriculum. Topics include our solar system, earth science, weather, matter, energy and lab skills. The exam is given in two parts. The lab test is given in January and includes several lab stations. The rest of the exam is given in June in the form of multiple choice and short answer questions.